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ON ANY GIVEN DAY Print
ON ANY GIVEN DAY Print
Our Price: $99.00

25" x 12.5"

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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THE GAME CHANGER Print
THE GAME CHANGER Print
Our Price: $150.00

25" x 12.5"

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SPEARHEAD OF THE ATTACK Print
SPEARHEAD OF THE ATTACK Print
Our Price: $175.00

25" x 15"

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY

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A Good Night's Work (By James Dietz)
A Good Night's Work (By James Dietz)
Our Price: $175.00

In the spring of 2004, Coalition Forces, led by the United States Military, were engaged in a vicious counter-insurgency fight in the newly liberated Iraq. Just a year earlier, the Coalition had invaded Iraq and crushed Saddam Hussein's armies in historical proportions. Cessation of major combat operations had been declared only 43 days after the war began.

The mission to uproot Saddam Hussein's ruling party was complete and Saddam himself in custody. The task of assisting Iraqis in the establishment of a stable government and rebuilding the country's infrastructure and economy lay ahead. Elements inside of Iraq were vying for control and influence in the yet-to-be established government, and many subsets of these elements would use fear, threats, and violence to manipulate the citizens of Iraq to comply. The Coalition, as the liberators of Iraq, were inherently involved in the struggle for establishment of a democratically elected government.

It was behind this backdrop in the spring of 2004 that the Soldiers of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment "Blackhorse" stationed at Fort Irwin and the National Training Center, California were ordered to relinquish their role as the trainers of soon-to-be combatants and begin their own training for future counter-insurgency operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom III.

In June, 2004 the 58th Engineers deployed to Camp Victory near Baghdad International Airport and Camp Cuervo in Southeastern Baghdad. In January 2005, 1st and 2nd Squadrons as well as the Regimental Headquarters deployed to Iraq. 1st Squadron (Ironhorse) deployed to Camp Taji in Northern Baghdad and later moved to Camp Liberty near Baghdad International Airport. 2nd Squadron (Eaglehorse) deployed to Forward Operating Base Kalsu, 35 miles south of Baghdad. The Regimental Headquarters deployed to Camp Courage in Mosul taking on the role as Headquarters, Task Force Freedom and Multi-National Division North West (MND-NW). All units were deployed for approximately one year with the last elements of the Regiment returning home to Fort Irwin in February 2006.

The scene depicted in this breathtaking print is of a typical combat patrol conducting a cordon and search. Over the course of an evening, many of these cordon and search missions would be conducted. Planning for these missions would start as much as a month in advance to literally just hours prior to execution. On the night of the mission, a patrol could raid up to fifteen targets searching for suspected terrorists and hidden weapon caches. These operations often began in the late evening and ran into the early morning thus lending credence to the print's title, "A Good Night's Work."

In the print we see a patrol leader reporting to his higher headquarters his current situation while in the HMMWV's turret a gunner provides local security for Soldiers as they exploit a discovered weapons cache. To the patrol leader's left is a Soldier removing an artillery shell from the discovered cache while to the immediate rear are four Soldiers with shovels looking into a hollowed out parcel of ground. Further back, we see four local nationals guarded by Blackhorse Troopers. This particular scene allows us to presume that these men were the suspected terrorists targeted by the evening's operation and the cache found was their supply of weapons and munitions used in their attacks against Coalition Forces. To the far right, stands an M2A2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle providing added security over the entire scene.

The entire scene depicts the difficulties faced and overcome by Blackhorse Troopers during their yearlong deployment yet resident in their demeanor is the calm professionalism and resolve in accomplishing the mission.

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY.

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Counter Attack (By James Dietz)
Counter Attack (By James Dietz)
Our Price: $175.00

First Rock Paratroopers maneuver against Taliban and Foreign Fighters after they are engaged in a far ambush while moving through a dry river bed in Eastern Paktika province. All the while gunners and our brave soldiers deliver withering return fire; they are fixing the enemy position, setting up a support by fire with 60mm mortars to suppress with high explosive rounds, denying the weary enemy escape routes with the support of attack aviation and finishing the enemy force with close air support JDAM strikes. The mountainous and canalizing terrain Eastern Paktika Province favors the ambusher, a fact that the Taliban used to the best of their ability. Nevertheless, precise and efficient coordination with air and indirect fire support, superior physical stamina and discipline among our individual paratroopers, and constant training meant that during contact, Task Force Eagle and 1-503rd Airborne, always maintained decisive advantage.

During Operation Enduring Freedom VIII, spanning from May 2007 to late July 2008, Task Force Eagle was responsible for maintaining security, improving governance and assisting with the development of Afghanistan's Eastern Paktika Province. The Battalion Task Force's area of operations included the sprawling tundra, rolling hills and craggy cliffs of the ten districts comprising Area of Operation Eagle: Gomal, Gayan, Bermel, Orgun, Naka, Zerok, Sar Hawzah, Southern Spera, Charboran and Sarobi. Over that fifteen month period, First Rock Paratroopers were involved in 346 troops in contact fights, fired just over 20,000 rounds of artillery and mortars, hit the enemy with 269 JDAMs, suffered 59 wounded in action and lost 12 of our beloved comrades to the conflict in the Eastern Paktika Province.

Through all of the sustained fighting the paratroopers of Task Force Eagle remained focused on improving governance in close partnership with each district governor, driving development efforts through the expenditure of a dramatic $22.4 million toward essential road, education, irrigation and agricultural projects, and provided an added measure of security for the devout people of Eastern Paktika through constant capacity building efforts with the Afghan National Army, National Police and Border Police. The strides of the brave soldiers of this great Task Force, made through these long months and at such a significant cost in blood and treasure, left an indelible mark in the history of warfare and gave this corner of Afghanistan a chance to enjoy true democracy for the first time in their history.

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY.

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The Rock And A Hard Place (By James Dietz)
The Rock And A Hard Place (By James Dietz)
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The Global War on Terrorism continued. After a very successful deployment to Afghanistan in support of OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM VI in 2005, TASK FORCE ROCK, under the 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team, was again called in support of OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM VIII. The subordinate units of TASK FORCE ROCK that participated in OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM VIII, consisted of Paratroopers, Soldiers and Airmen from: Headquarters and Headquarters Company "The Black Sheep", Able Company "Warlords", Battle Company "Battle Hard", Chosen Company "the Chosen Few", Destined Company "Destined for Victory", Fusion Company "Support the Rock", 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry, and embedded coalition partners from TASK FORCE PHOENIX (United States Marine Corps Embedded Tactical Trainers to the Afghan National Army), the 201st Corps, Afghan National Army, the Afghan National Police, and the Afghan Border Police. The Battalion executed combat operations with various US Army units including 3rd Special Forces Group, 7th Special Forces Group; artillery support from 4th Battalion (Airborne), 319th Field Artillery Regiment and 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 321st Field Artillery Regiment; and aviation task forces from TASK FORCE TALON (2nd Battalion, 82nd Aviation, 82nd ABN DIV) and TASK FORCE OUTFRONT (2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st ABN DIV (Air Assault)). THE ROCK received great combat support and service support from the 173d's Brigade Support Battalion and the Brigade Special Troops Battalion. TASK FORCE ROCK was under the command of Lieutenant Colonel William B. Ostlund and Command Sergeant Major Bradley K.Meyers, the Battalion Command Sergeant Major.

TASK FORCE ROCK deployed in May of 2007 in support of CJTF-82 (and later CJTF-101) in the most rugged, austere, and volatile areas of Kunar and Nuristan Provinces, Afghanistan. The Task Force Command Group operated out of Camp Blessing and the remainder of the Task Force operated out of eighteen satellite bases spread across the two Afghan provinces. This entailed moving and sustaining the Task Force across tremendous distances by helicopter, vehicle, and foot as well as continuous decentralized operations at the platoon and squad level partnered with elements of the Afghan National Army, Afghan National Police, and Afghan Border Police.

The name of the print, "THE ROCK and a Hard Place", is indicative of the austere, rugged terrain THE ROCK operated in and more importantly, of the American Paratroopers' resolve and determination to complete any mission set before them. Through its history and without fail, THE ROCK has demonstrated it moves quickly with limited information and accomplishes the intent - always. The intent consistently conveyed to THE ROCK has been - relentlessly find, pursue, and defeat America's enemies. The challenges faced by THE ROCK in OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM VIII led to TASK FORCE ROCK adopting the phrase - "If it's possible it's been done; if it's impossible we'll do it."

This print is dedicated to ROCK Paratroopers, both past and present, and those that served with and supported TASK FORCE ROCK, 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. During OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM VIII, 26 members of TASK FORCE ROCK made the ultimate sacrifice while engaged in combat with insurgents and terrorists whilst protecting Afghan citizens and preventing the return of oppression and tyranny to Afghanistan.

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY.

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Into the Orchards (By James Dietz)
Into the Orchards (By James Dietz)
Our Price: $175.00

Since Alexander the Great, foreign armies have tried unsuccessfully to push their enemy out of the Arghandab River Valley. In the early morning hours of August 28, 2009 Task Force Stryker attacked into the "green zone" of the Southern Arghandab River Valley for Operation Opportunity Hold. This surprise assault signaled the first day of three major operations. During the Soviet War, a Russian Division had attacked into the same area for 34 days and could not defeat the Mujahedeen. Within 34 hours, Task Force Stryker had secured a foothold and for the next several months, continuous operations would eventually overwhelm the Taliban, and force them to relinquish the area to the Americans.

Devastating combat resources were poured into the Arghandab River Valley to sustain a high tempo of brigade action. In the first major operation 1-17 Infantry, the main effort, took responsibility for the north. 2-1 Infantry, augmented with one troop from 8-1 Cavalry, assumed control in the south. 3-17 Field Artillery provided accurate and timely fire support. Soldiers from the brigade's 562nd Engineer Company waged their own war against the IED threat often conducting their clearing operations under enemy direct fire.

Special Operations units frequently contributed their expertise to Stryker efforts in the valley. The brigade's Tactical Site Exploitation unit established a forward evidentiary triage location that provided prompt feedback on captured materials. The 402d BSB conducted combat recovery missions for units still in contact with the enemy. Canadian-mentored Afghan National Security Forces were routine partners and Air Force Joint Tactical Air Controllers, in a direct support role to the brigade, gave units on the ground immediate access to needed fixed wing firepower. Task Force Stryker soldiers operated daily under the aegis of the Kiowa and Apache helicopters from Task Force Saber, the Air Cavalry Squadron of Task Force Pegasus.

In total there were three major brigade operations but Task Force Buffalo would conduct the brigade's day-to-day combat in the valley and faced an onslaught of harsh conditions as they struggled over the dense head-high mud walls. These obstacles, impenetrable to all but the most extreme munitions, surrounded compounds, constricted movement, and protected lurking Taliban fighters. Away from the mud-wall mazes, thick orchards and dense brush required units to frequently abandon their Strykers - and the protective armor and gun systems they carry - in favor of dismounted patrols in the exhaustive heat. The Buffalos were often joined by other members of Task Force Stryker as the brigade massed its limited resources in the area. Every battalion would contribute at least a company to operations in the terrible terrain of the valley. Mohawks, Legionnaires, Blackhawks, Blacksmiths, and Punishers would all dismount under the watchful indirect fire umbrella of the Stryke battalion to conquer the Taliban.

Task Force Stryker's duty in the southern Arghandab River Valley ended in December 2009, when the brigade received a new mission in Regional Command-South. 35 Stryker Soldiers were killed in action in southern Afghanistan, 21 of them in the valley, and three comrades succumbed to non-battle illness and injury. Stryker soldiers would conduct successful operations in five of six provinces in Regional Command- South during their year-long deployment. But in nearly a decade of war against the Americans, August- December 2009 in the Arghandab River Valley was the first sustained conventional force assault - really a pursuit - that the Taliban had faced. In the end, they could not withstand the determination of Stryker soldiers who dismounted and moved "into the orchards" to destroy their Taliban enemy.

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY.

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Chosin Fires (By James Dietz)
Chosin Fires (By James Dietz)
Our Price: $175.00

In the history of warfare, many battles have made manifest the fact that when forces join on the field of battle, Field Artillery firepower is the element of combat that makes a difference. Such was the case in late November and early December 1950 at the Chosin Reservoir, in the Republic of Korea.

This epic conflict, characterized by misery, cold, exhaustion, and sacrifice, portrays an epic 17-day struggle between primarily U.S. and Chinese Communist Forces. To say the conditions were tough is an understatement. The bitter cold cut so deeply that the men became numb and the equipment ceased operating. When the opportunity arose to change boots, soldiers could see the ice crystals that had formed between their toes; some died while advancing, merely from the shock of the coldness. The fluid in the howitzers recoil systems became more like glue, and at night, the only way to keep the men and the guns warm was to keep them firing. That worked out well, as there was no shortage of targets.

The Chinese military had sent 10 Divisions, 120,000 of its very best troops south that November with orders to annihilate the US and its allies "to the last man." These were not farmers or conscripts; most of the Chinese troops were veterans of the victorious campaigns against Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist forces. They came to Chosin looking for a fight, and that's just what they got.

The battle at Chosin was ripe for heavy firepower, but the sea was 70 miles away, thus no naval gunfire; and the weather was often unfit for flying, thus affecting air support. Just as so many times before, consistent firepower was in the able hands of the King of Battle - the Field Artillery. The Chinese Communist Forces didn't count on the ferocity or the tenacity of American soldiers and marines, nor did they anticipate the shocking blow they would be dealt by the Redlegs sent to keep watch over them.

Outnumbered six to one, the Allied forces chose retrograde operations, and began the long march through narrow, mountainous defiles south to Hagaru-Ri. Field Artillery of every kind supported the U.S. forces: Army and Marine Corps, light and heavy cannons; towed and self-Propelled howitzers; Active and Reserve Forces destroying enemy targets with direct and indirect fires. Many redlegs alternated between fighting as artillerymen or as infantry, whatever the battle required, while leapfrogging their way back to relative safety.

This vast mix of fire support came together to create effects so devastating to the enemy that when it was over, the nearly impossible had happened: seven of the ten Chinese Communist divisions were destroyed, and would never see combat again during the Korean War. America sacrificed many lives during those 17 days in the winter 1950, but in the end, what should statistically have been an irrefutable annihilation of American troops, was a lesson in Field Artillery and Firepower for our foes.

Determined forces of freedom lived to tell the story of those 17 days: of the unbearable cold, of the impossible odds, of the loss of comrades, and of the times when the effects of Field Artillery made the impossible suddenly seem possible, the hopeless seem attainable. These men, these heroes, will never forget the extraordinary role that they and their "Chosin Fires" played in an unforgettable chapter of our Field Artillery heritage.

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY.

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Launch, Recover, Launch (By James Dietz)
Launch, Recover, Launch (By James Dietz)
Our Price: $175.00

When MG James E. Simmons, Deputy Commanding General of Multi-National Corps Iraq, referred to Operation Iraqi Freedom as "the second helicopter war," he made reference both to the distinguished heritage of Army Aviation stretching back to the first helicopter war, Vietnam, and to the incredible contributions of Army Aviation to the counterinsurgency campaign in Iraq. Army Aviation has become more indispensable in each succeeding year of this conflict; Task Force XII and Task Force 49 have added unprecedented achievements to that record in OIF 07-09.

The first 12th CAB unit in Iraq was the 2-159th "Gunslinger" Attack Reconnaissance Battalion from Illesheim, Germany. On 30 June 2008 they made first contact with the enemy near Ramadi. The "Professionals" of the 412th Aviation Support Battalion deployed next and accomplished air and ground maintenance and logistical support for the task force. The 3-158th Assault Helicopter Battalion from Katterbach, organized as Task Force Storm, arrived in July and began air assault support for Special Operations missions. The "Storm Riders" were joined in their mission by Company B, "Big Windy," 5-158th General Support Aviation Battalion. Task Force Ready, made up of the remainder of Katterbach's 5-158th GSAB, took on general support missions, moving Soldiers and cargo throughout the theater. They also took on the VIP mission in Iraq, allowing senior leaders to move quickly and safely throughout their operational areas. Joining the 12th CAB at Balad was the 2-147th "Dust Devil" Assault Helicopter Battalion. These National Guard Soldiers came from Minnesota,Washington and Hawaii, and joined Task Force Ready in general support missions around Iraq. Completing Task Force XII at Balad in November 2007 were the Soldiers and fixed-wing aircraft from Task Force Hawk, 244th Aviation Brigade. A combination of National Guard and Reserve Soldiers, they flew the Army's only non-reconnaissance fixed wing aircraft in Iraq.

In November 2007, Task Force XII received a change of mission. The Brigade Headquarters and 3-158th AHB moved to Camp Taji, Iraq to form an aviation task force in support of Multi-National Division - Baghdad. Just before Thanksgiving, Soldiers from Fort Wainwright, Alaska's Task Force 49 arrived and assumed the mission as the headquarters for the five battalions at Balad. Task Force XII and 3-158th arrived at Camp Taji in December and joined the 4th "Longknife" Squadron, 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment, from Fort Hood, Texas. 4/3 ACR proved a perfect fit for the newly-formed task force. They provided aviation maintenance and AH-64 attack capabilities for the division, and also brought a troop of Black Hawk helicopters which joined with Task Force Storm to perform air assault and general support missions for MND-B. Task Force XII also formed a tactical unmanned aerial vehicle company at Taji. Comprised of Soldiers from throughout the brigade and UAV operators from six of MND-B's brigade combat teams, Company G, Task Force XII ran the largest UAV operation in Iraq.

In addition to forming the task force for MND-B, Task Force XII deployed aviation packages to support Coalition forces in central and southern Iraq. Indeed, the Gunslingers and Dust Devils spent much of the 07-09 deployment split across two or three separate operating locations. During a spike in violence in late March, 2008, Gunslinger, Storm, Dust Devil, Big Windy and Longknife aviators distinguished themselves by responding heroically to aggressive enemy attacks in Basrah and Baghdad. The pilots flew hundreds of hours across Iraq and recorded dozens of successful engagements in a three week period of intense combat. Their actions were cited as helping to bring about a quick and decisive end to daily indirect fire and force on force attacks. With a final mission change in July 2008, TF XII returned to the MNC-I mission at Balad, while 4/3 ACR and TF Storm moved to Baghdad International Airport to assume the mission for MND-Center under TF 49.

Over the course of their deployment to Iraq, the Soldiers of Task Force XII and Task Force 49 set the standard for aviation support in theater. OIF 07-09 was a key period of transition, as an increase in ground combat forces reduced violence to historic low levels, setting the conditions for political reconciliation. Units at Balad, Taji, BIAP, and Basrah combined to fly more than 110,000 hours, moving more than 272,500 passengers and almost 18 million pounds of cargo, and engaging the enemy on over two hundred separate occasions. Launch, Recover, Launch depicts a routine moment during the brigade's five hundred days of flying and fighting in Iraq. Along Alpha Taxiway at Balad, a UH-60 "mission set," two Blackhawks and their crews, prepares to launch. The crew members of Chalk One inspect their aircraft, their equipment, and each other to ensure that all is ready. A group of Soldiers load equipment while crew members conduct a final mission briefing. In the background, a CH-47 Chinook stands ready to launch after sunset on a critical resupply or air assault mission. Overhead, a Gunslinger Air Weapons Team leaves Balad on a mission in support of ground forces somewhere in Iraq. Ground support personnel move about the ramp, refueling aircraft and conducting maintenance services. This seemingly mundane but incredibly complex scene encapsulates the daily contributions of over four thousand Soldiers, of all ranks and occupational specialties, to the incredible achievements of Task Force XII and Task Force 49.

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Lions of Salah ad Din (By James Dietz)
Lions of Salah ad Din (By James Dietz)
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Soldiers from 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment (Task Force Black Lion) are halted while conducting a joint patrol in the streets of Samarra during the heat of the Iraqi summer. The Soldiers frequently conduct joint patrols inside the city in order to meet with key leaders, inspect on-going reconstruction projects, respond to IEDs and small arms attacks, and investigate purported weapons caches. The patrol is accompanied by our Iraqi Security Force partners. As part of the mission to advise and assist the ISF, 1-28IN Soldiers (representing members of Attack, Battle, Combat, Destroyer, Excalibur and Hunter Companies) work alongside their Iraqi counterparts in all facets of daily life. They carry only the essentials (ACUs, Boots, Kevlar Helmet, Gloves, Eye Protection, Knee Pads, Interceptor Body Armor, Magazine Pouches, Radio Pouches, Utility Pouches, Water Source, M4's, M203's, M249's, M9's, and M14's) as they live and work out of a nearby Joint Coordination Center along with their ISF counterparts (Blue variant of ACUs; AK-47's; Mix of Patrol Caps, Berets, and Kevlar Helmets; and Assorted Equipment Bearing Vests). The platoon moves in a platoon column with squads in trailing wedges and ISF interspersed throughout the formation. An ISF pickup truck (Ford F-150) with a heavy weapon gunner (PKM) trails the patrol ready to assist with blocking traffic and evacuating a casualty if required. OH-58s (Kiowas) fly overhead, providing over-watch, while staying away from airspace directly over the Al-Askari Shrine (Golden Mosque). Despite the threats that exist all around them, the citizens of Samarra are out on the streets conducting business as usual. Few, mostly children, even pay much attention to the patrol as they have grown accustomed to seeing US Forces. Most people are either indifferent or happy to see US and Iraqi Soldiers securing their streets, but the occasional scowl can be seen. Most of the Soldiers smile and are respectful of local Iraqis while remaining vigilant for any sign of trouble. A rifleman pulls security at an intersection and scans the rooftops of blown out buildings for any threats. A squad leader issues instructions to his team leaders regarding a change in the patrol route. The streets of Samarra are still marred from years of fighting when the city was on the verge of complete destruction as is evidenced by the rubble, trash, and pock-marked walls. The Al-Askari Shrine (Golden Mosque of Samarra) can be seen in the background. The Mosque continues to be put back together following the bombings that brought it down and touched off sectarian violence all over Iraq in 2006 and 2007. There exists a definite parallel between the Mosque's repair status and Samarra's reconstruction progress. Although the Mosque is now standing and continues to be repaired, more work remains. Soon, with continued efforts from US Forces and the Government of Iraq, Samarra too will be rebuilt to its former glory and economic/historical and iconic status in the region.

ALL PUBLISHERS PROOF SIGNED AND NUMBERED, WITH CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY.

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